Tag Archives: twitter

The Poet

h

April is not only the month bloggers participate in the A to Z challenge, it’s also National Poetry month. I adore poets and love to read poetry. I have dabbled in poetry writing since I was a teenager but I don’t think I’m good enough to be considered a true poet.

Today, I’m sharing a Haiku I wrote in honor of Spring and today’s letter-H.

The Poet

Resurrecting Sun
Fresh air twirls through sprouting blooms
The poet observes

1 Comment

Filed under A to Z, writers, Writing

FUN FACTS ABOUT SOME WELL-KNOWN AUTHORS

f

It’s always fun to discover facts about authors. It’s neat to learn that they have hobbies other than writing or that they too knocked on many doors before finding the one that opened. Today, I’ve compiled a list of some fun facts about a few of my favorite authors. Do you have any author facts that you would like to share?

guy

S.E. Hinton: (The Outsiders, Rumble Fish, Tex etc.): Was born Susie Eloise Hinton. She chose to use her initials because she didn’t want people to know she was a woman. It’s also said that she didn’t want boys to be put off by a female author.

Stephen King and Mitch Albom: (are in a band together with a few other famous authors. Their band is called The Rock Bottom Remainders.)

Ray Bradbury:
Didn’t consider himself a science-fiction author. He believed he was more of a fantasy writer.

Roald Dahl and Ernest Hemingway were friends

Edgar Allen Poe: Enjoyed attending his local book club

Suzanne Collins: Worked at Nickelodeon and wrote stories for shows such as Oswald and Little Bear

Charles Dickens: Was a member of The Ghost Club

I loved collecting these facts, some I already knew but other’s surprised me, how about you?

8 Comments

Filed under A to Z, authors, writers, Writing

THE EMOTION THESAURUS

E

EMOTION

Do you have problems conveying your characters emotions? Do you find that whenever your character is happy, you simply write that they “smiled?” Does Sally (your main character) pout when she’s sad or yell when she’s mad? There is so much more to those emotions than a smile, a pout or a burst of expletives.
When I began submitting my novel to agents for consideration, I kept getting partial and full requests but then the rejections followed. The rejections almost always included something positive like (great plot, very imaginative, good writing, etc.) but often ended with I’m not connecting with the character. I couldn’t understand the rejections. I didn’t know what I was doing wrong or how to correct it. But then one day, it hit me. My main character was flat; the emotions were not built up enough to make a reader want to follow her on her journey.
Now that I knew what was wrong, I had to learn how to fix it. So, when I was on Twitter one day and saw someone tweet about The Emotion Thesaurus, my curiosity was piqued. I told my critique partner about the book and she surprised me and purchased the book for herself and me (pretty awesome right?).
This book has helped me immensely and deserves a plug. The authors Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi are both writers and together host The Bookshelf Muse, an online resource for writers.
I thought this book was all I needed until I recently discovered that they have additional books such as The Negative Trait Thesaurus and The Positive Trait Thesaurus. I’m currently combing through my manuscript and beefing up my character with the help of these amazing books. I’m hoping the rejections turn into more requests that turn into offers rather than rejections.
Do you struggle with writing about emotions? What emotion do you have the most difficult time tapping into?
Do you have any books that you refer to when building up your character?

19 Comments

Filed under A to Z, books, emotions, Writing

DAY JOBS (A TO Z)

vitamind

0511-1011-1315-0030_People_of_Various_Occupations_Dressed_for_Work_clipart_image

In our corner of the world we are writers. We chat about are works in progress, our submissions, our insecurities and our high hopes. We share so much of ourselves with each other through our words but yet we rarely talk about our day jobs. Sure, we might mention wanting to one day quit them to write full time, but the conversation usually stops there.
Some of us have been reading each other’s blogs and leaving comments for years yet we have no idea what each other do for a paycheck during the hours we aren’t writing.
I like that here in cyber world we are solely writers, but for today’s a to z challenge I thought it would be fun if we share what our occupations are with each other.
Do you spend your day in a classroom teaching economics? Are you a teller at bank? A hairdresser? A doctor? A scientist?
My forty hours a week are spent inside a casino. It’s a fun job. I’m what they call a dual rate. I’m a dealer certain days and other days, I’m a supervisor. I work with numbers during the day and words at night. I find it to be a nice balance but I’d prefer to write full time and deal part time.

Do you hope to one day quit your day job to write full time or is writing your hobby?

24 Comments

Filed under A to Z, Fiction, writer's life, writing, Writing

Contest for YA fiction Writers

sun

Are you a young adult fiction author? If you are polish up the first two hundred words of your manuscript and enter the Writer’s “Dear Lucky Agent Contest.”
Writer’s Digest is holding its 15th free lucky agent contest. Three lucky winners (I’d love to be one of them wouldn’t you?) will get get 1) A critique of the first 10 double-spaced pages of your work, by your agent judge. 2) A free one-year subscription to WritersMarket.com ($50 value)!

The agent this month is Andrea Somberg. Here is the description Writer’s Digest gives for Ms. Somberg:
A literary agent for close to fifteen years, Andrea Somberg represents a wide range of fiction and nonfiction, including projects aimed at a young adult and middle grade audience. Previously an agent at the Donald Maass Agency and Vigliano Associates, she joined Harvey Klinger Inc. in the spring of 2005. Andrea has also been a MediaBistro instructor, teaching courses on writing nonfiction and memoir book proposals.

Be sure to hurry because this contest will be closed to submissions as of Wednesday, April 9th. To check out the full details click here.

Contests are a great way to get discovered. If you are entering a contest be sure that the site holding the contest is reputable. Good Luck,
If you don’t write YA fiction, let me know what you do write. I’m always interested in the genre’s people choose to write.

7 Comments

Filed under A to Z, contests, writer's life, writers

BRAINSTORMING EXERCISE

images (5)

In November I attended a writing conference where we met with some great authors, illustrators, agents and editors. It was a two day conference filled with writing tips, critiques, pitch fests and mini workshops. I had a workshop with Linda Oatman High, a successful children and young adult author. Linda was AWESOME. She shared stories of her road to success, offered advice and gave us a super cool writing exercise that I’m going to give to you today. At the end of this exercise, I will share the fiction story I wrote that day.
Grab a pen and get out a piece of paper (or your laptop). Are you ready?

Write down a symbol of hope.
Write down one or two difficult times in your life.
Write down something that recently made you laugh.

Now take everything you just wrote and write a short story. You might find yourself asking how they will possibly fit together but believe me you will come up with something. If you are willing, share with us your story. If you don’t feel comfortable or have time to comment with your story then maybe just comment with the answers you wrote for the prompts given above.

As promised, here is what I came up with.
*Symbol of hope-I chose a dove
*Two difficult times in my life
1. The death of my father
2. Being an overweight teenager
*Something that recently made me laugh – I wrote down “What If” scenarios and trying to apply makeup to my husband on Halloween (we had an idea that just wasn’t coming together, the more I tried to fix the make-up, the worse it became).

Here is the story I wrote.

Every dress I tried on made me look like an Orca. I succumbed to the fact that I was going to be the fat daughter standing at the casket. I don’t remember the drive to the funeral home but I do recall the half hour before the public came in to pay their respects. I stood above the simple wooden casket staring at my lifeless hero, stroking his cold forehead and kissing his cool cheeks trying to remember the warmth they once held.
Random memories surfaced as my face filled with tears. I don’t know how I could forget the car ride over but remember the fight we had one Halloween. My mother insisted he dressed up like the rest of us. “We are trick or treating as a family,” she yelled. As she scrambled about the house gathering our costumes my father sat patiently as my eight year old brother smudged my father’s face with paint from a kit purchased at a costume store. “You’re going to look scary but cool,” my brother said.
My oldest sister flew into my bedroom whining “I don’t want to go trick or treating. I’m a teenager for crying out loud,” she protested.
“Can I eat your candy?” I asked. All I was thinking about at that moment was chocolate, sugar and more chocolate. I followed her out the room continuing to beg for her candy (I knew regardless if she wanted to go, she was going to be forced to go). She ignored my pleading and headed down the steps. I raced behind her shouting “Erika can I eat your candy?” All I wanted was to hear her say yes. I skipped the last step to get to her sooner. When I hit the landing, I felt a crunch beneath my foot. My father still sitting on the floor getting his face done, looked up when he heard the sound. His face wasn’t cool or scary, it was ridiculous. I would have laughed at the blur of mish mash colors across his face if it wasn’t for the fury I saw swimming in his eyes. When I lifted my foot, I saw the remains of the shattered ceramic dove his mother painted for him when he was six years old, three years before she died.
It was usually on the mantle of our fireplace in its special spot but that day my father allowed my brother to take it in for show and tell. He didn’t put it back. “I’m sorry Daddy,” my brother mumbled before his eyes lowered. My father’s head shook. He looked at me “You should be giving away candy not trying to eat more,” he said. My heart crashed from his hurtful words. I knew at that moment that my father the only person in my world who never made a fat comment to me thought I was fat.
The memory faded as people from his life filled the small room. I took my spot next to my siblings and thanked the people offering condolences. I couldn’t stop myself from thinking that as they were telling me they were sorry for my loss they were also thinking she’s the fat daughter.
When the night came to an end and the funeral parlor emptied. I kissed my father’s cheek and said goodbye once again.
I heard its call when I stepped outside. I stood paralyzed. Above my head on a telephone wire a dove cooed. I looked up at the bird. Its head nodded as if it was acknowledging me. It might have been nothing to someone else, but to me it was my father giving me a sign in the form of a dove. Perhaps he didn’t want that memory to occupy anymore space in my mind. I let the memory of the only hurtful word my father spoke to me during his life fly away with the bird.

10 Comments

Filed under A to Z, brainstorm, Fiction, writers, Writing

A to Z Challenge

A2Z-BADGE-000 [2014]

The April A to Z Challenge starts in two days. Who is participating? I’m attempting yet again to do this challenge. I tried for the last two years to get to the letter Z but I never made it. I can’t promise this will be the year but I’m going to give it another shot. I love the A to Z challenge for numerous reasons.

1. It makes me think. I try really hard to come up with interesting topics and love to see what comes to mind.

2. It’s a great way to meet other writers. I have met some great writers through the A to Z challenge and still visit their blogs whenever I get a chance.

3. New readers find your blog.

4. It helps build discipline. (Anything that encourages you to write everyday is a good thing).

5. It’s interesting to see what others come up with.

6. It’s fun.

If you are participating in this challenge leave a comment letting me know. I will stop by your blog to see what you are writing about.

Have fun. Happy Writing!

10 Comments

Filed under A to Z, life, writer's life, writers, Writing